Fridays in the Field: Getting to Know the Sea Lamprey
Fisheries & Aquatic Life / Fridays in the Field

Fridays in the Field: Getting to Know the Sea Lamprey

Today’s guest post comes from Hillary Ballek, field scientist at CFE/Save the Sound. Hillary monitors dam removal sites within Connecticut to assess biological health of streams and wetland areas. The sea lamprey is an anadromous species of fish native to the Connecticut River, migrating from the ocean to fresh water streams to spawn during the … Continue reading

Fridays in the Field: Introducing New Haven to new bioswales
Fridays in the Field / Rain Gardens & GI

Fridays in the Field: Introducing New Haven to new bioswales

This week’s Fridays in the Field post comes from Kendall Barbery, Green Infrastructure Program Manager: The West River—which flows from Bethany, CT, to New Haven Harbor—is on Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s (CT DEEP) 303-d list of impaired waterbodies due to high levels of bacteria and other pollution. According to the West River … Continue reading

Fridays in the Field: Letting Whitford Brook take its course
Fridays in the Field / Habitat Restoration / Uncategorized

Fridays in the Field: Letting Whitford Brook take its course

This week’s Fridays in the Field post comes from Anna Marshall, Green Projects associate. Last week, you heard from the Green Projects team about vegetation monitoring efforts at the Pond Lily dam removal site. This week, we are taking you an hour further northeast to learn about another monitoring effort occurring at the Hyde Pond … Continue reading

Planting for the Future: Green Infrastructure Updates from the Pequonnock River
Fridays in the Field / Rain Gardens & GI / Sustainable Communities

Planting for the Future: Green Infrastructure Updates from the Pequonnock River

Since 2013, Save the Sound has worked to improve the health of the Pequonnock River—which drains land from Monroe to Bridgeport—with restoration projects that prevent polluted rainwater runoff and improve the ability of alewife, blueback herring, and other migratory fish to swim from source to Sound (and back again). Rivers like the Pequonnock are especially … Continue reading